How to Teach: Adjectives

Instructions coming soon.

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How to Teach: Nouns

There are a few phases to teaching the signs for nouns. In this lesson, we’ll find out what they are.

Phase One

Step One

Sign “What is that?” :

Step one – point to the object
Step two – sign “what” with lowered, questioning eyebrows.

Step Two

Point to the object and sign the corresponding sign.

After you do this for a week, start phase two of teaching. In phase two, the steps are as follows.

Phase Two

Step One

Sign “What is that?”

Step Two

Make them sign the object’s sign. Help them form the sign with their hand until they can do it on their own.

Step Three

Point to the object and sign the corresponding sign.

This is the final phase. This begins after the child regularly signs in response to the signed question and, hopefully, uses that sign independently to express their want/need.

Phase Three

Step One

Sign “What is that?”

Step Two

Wait till they sign it before smiling and giving Indian head-bobble ascent.

This can be a positive, game-like activity. You could teach the kids to play this as a game with each other.

For nouns to teach with this method, go to the category “Sign Language Dictionary – Topical” and then the subcategory “Nouns.”

Or click here.

How to Teach: Health (dirty, wash, clean)

Words hold concepts. By teaching words, we teach concepts to the children. An essential concept is that of health. By teaching them the concepts of dirtiness, washing, and cleaness, and the corresponding negativity of dirtiness and positivity of cleanliness, we give them, ultimately, the concept of good health.

There are a few phases to teaching the signs for dirty, wash, and clean. In this lesson, we’ll find out what they are.

Phase One

Step One

Before you wash the children, sign “dirty” with a negative expression on your face.

Then sign “wash” with raised, questioning eyebrows.

(This is asking them “Do you need to be washed?”)

Step Two

While you wash them, occasionally sign the word for wash with natural, statement eyebrows and a positive expression and attitude.

Step Three

When you have finished washing the child sign “wash finished.”

Then sign “clean” with raised, questioning eyebrows followed by “clean” with neutral, statement eyebrows.

After you do this for a week, start phase two of teaching. In phase two, the steps are as follows.

Phase Two

Step One

Before you wash the children, sign “dirty” with a negative expression on your face.

Have the child also sign “dirty.” Help them form the sign with their hands till they can do it on their own.

Step Two

Then sign “wash” with raised, questioning eyebrows.

And have the child sign “wash” in response.

Step Three

While you wash them, occasionally sign the word for wash with natural, statement eyebrows and a positive expression and attitude.

Step Four

When you are finished washing them, sign “wash finished.” And then “clean.”

Have the child sign “clean” too.

This is the final phase. This begins after the child regularly signs in response to the signed question and, hopefully, uses that sign independently to express their want/need.

Phase Three

Step One

Before you wash the children, sign “dirty” with a negative expression on your face.

Wait for the child to sign “dirty.”

Step Two

Then sign “wash” with raised, questioning eyebrows.

And wait for the child to sign “wash” in response.

Step Three

While you wash them, occasionally sign the word for wash with natural, statement eyebrows and a positive expression and attitude.

Step Four

When you are finished washing them, sign “wash finished.” And then “clean.”

Wait for the child to sign “clean” too, and wobble your head in approval.

How to Teach: Expressing Want

In this section, we will not only learn how to teach the word want, but also how to express who is the one wanting and what they want. This is the first explanation of a subject-directobject-verb sentence. In this section we will learn the following:
– You want that?
– You want that.
– I want that.
– No
– Ok
– Wait

Phase One

Step One

When you recognize they want something, sign “You want that?”

To do this:
1. Sign “you” (point to them)
2. Sign “that” (point to what they want)
3. Sign “want”

Step Two

At this point, you have two choices for what to do:
1. If they are not supposed to have what they want. Sign “no”
2. If they are allowed to have what they want, bobble your head to show them you understand them and either give it to them (if you have it) or sign “wait,” get it, and give it to them.

After you do this for a week, start phase two of teaching. In phase two, the steps are as follows.

Phase Two

Step One

When you recognize they want something, sign “You want that?”

Step Two

Make them sign “I want that.” Help them form the signs with their hand until they can do it on their own.

Step Three

At this point, you have two choices for what to do:
1. If they are not supposed to have what they want. Sign “no”
2. If they are allowed to have what they want, bobble your head to show them you understand them and either give it to them (if you have it) or sign “wait,” get it, and give it to them.

This is the final phase. This begins after the child regularly signs in response to the signed question and, hopefully, uses that sign independently to express their want/need.

Phase Three

Step One

When you recognize they want something, sign “You want that?”

Step Two

Wait till they sign it before responding.

How to Teach: Expressing Beatings

In this section, we will not only learn how to teach the word hit, but also how to express who hit who and respond to that. We will also find out how to request and give forgiveness. In this section we will learn the following:
– He/she hit you.
– You hit him/her
– He/she hit me
– No
– Don’t hit
– You ask her for forgiveness
– Forgive me
– I forgive you

 

 

Phase One

Step One

When you see one child hit another child:

Sign to the child who was hit – “That person hit you.”

To do this:
1. Sign “that person” (point to the child who hit)
2. Sign “you” (point to the child who was hit)
3. Sign “hit”

Step Two

Sign to the child who hit – “You hit that person.”

To do this:
1. Sign “you” (point to the child who hit)
2. Sign “that person” (point to the child was hit)
3. Sign “hit”

Step Three

Sign to the child who hit: “No. Don’t hit.”

Do this by:
1. Signing “no”
2. Shaking your head no while signing “hit.”

Step Four

Sign to the child who hit: “Ask for that person’s forgiveness.”
1. Sign “you” (point to the child you’re addressing)
2. Sign “him/her” (point to the child he/she hit)
3. Sign “ask”
4. Sign “forgive me.”

Step Five

Help the child who hit sign “forgive me.” and help the child who was hit sign “I forgive you.”

“I forgive you” is signed:

1. Sign “me”
2. Sign “you”
3. Sign “forgive”

After you do this for a week, start phase two of teaching. In phase two, the steps are as follows.

Step One

When you see one child hit another child:

Sign to the child who was hit – “That person hit you.”

Step Two

Sign to the child who hit – “You hit that person.”

Step Three

Sign to the child who hit: “No. Don’t hit.”

Step Four

Sign to the child who hit: “Ask for that person’s forgiveness.”

Step Five

Wait for them to sign “Forgive me” and “I forgive you.” Help them as necessary.

Have them hug in reconciliation,

This is the final phase. This begins after the child regularly signs in response to the signed question and, hopefully, uses that sign independently to express their want/need.

Phase Three

Step One

When you see that a child is hit or that child expresses being hit, sign to the child who hit “No. Don’t hit. Ask forgiveness.”

Step Two

Variations:

“Stop hitting” variation: If the child is hitting another child as you are watching, sign the one-handed negatively expressed “finish.” to mean “stop it!” Then proceed to the asking forgiveness part.

Hitting is wrong Variation: This can be a great opportunity to teach them the difference between right and wrong. This can be expressed after their reconciliation by signing:

Hitting bad (with negative expression)
Hugging good (with positive expression)

In addition: This is also a great opportunity to teach them to ask God for forgiveness. See lesson entitled: “How to Teach: Asking God’s Forgiveness.”